Monday, March 12, 2007

Uh-oh: A thought

Jeffrey and I were walking around today through what Julie calls our fishing village neighborhood. There are a lot of small, independent businesses there, and we make it a point to patronize them -- to a point. There's a small used bookstore that's closing for good downtown, and Jeffrey lamented the fact that we didn't have a good used bookstore anymore. I said, sure we do, the Internet. And he said it's hard for independent businesses to compete with what the Internet can offer.

But then I thought about it: What if the Internet, as an aggregate, is like Wal-Mart for small, independent businesses? I shop online because I can get anything I want for cheap. It's very convenient. And aren't those the reasons people say they shop at Wal-Mart? I make a personal decision to not shop at Wal-Mart, but that seems like it might be a little empty to me now.

The second thought I had when we were out walking was that I wondered if dogs' paws hurt when they walk on the hard concrete. That made me feel bad for them. My feet would hurt if they were on the concrete, and I don't even shuffle along as fast as they do. Maybe that is mitigated by the fact that their weight is dispersed over 4 feet, however. Then again, their feet are really, really small, and they actually only walk on the pads, which are even smaller. At any rate, I wonder if they should wear little pawshoes.

2 comments:

Laura said...

I wonder about that, too! But I think dogs' nails help offset any (great) pain from walking.

Julie said...

Now that I've had a dog for, oh, six months, I feel perfectly qualified to offer my opinion on doggie feet and concrete. (You can call me "The Dog Lady" now in addition to my title of "The Cat Lady." Until my betta fish died last week, I started thinking of myself as "The Betta Lady.") So, anyway, where was I? Oh. My hunch is that dogs aren't bothered by walking on concrete. If it hurt their feet, they'd cry out, limp or do other things, like maybe lick their pads obsessively. Hiking the Appalachian Trail with a dog, however, is a different story. Of the few dogs I saw hiking with their humans, I witnessed some pad deterioration. I thinking taking a dog on a hike like that (2,000-plus miles) is not a good thing. Martha Stewert would definitely not approve.